Search found 28 matches

by trekmate
Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:47 am
Forum: Home Brewing
Topic: fermented honey recipes
Replies: 2
Views: 298

Re: fermented honey recipes

I use fermented honey to make flapjacks (in place of Golden Syrup - Tate & Lyles in UK, King in US). Works really well for ginger flapjack (add chunks of crystallised ginger to the mix).
by trekmate
Thu Apr 06, 2017 6:52 am
Forum: Randoms
Topic: permaculture
Replies: 19
Views: 926

Re: permaculture

SiWolKe wrote:The seed balls I will try.
I collected many seeds from plants I saw used by bees over the year and can do the seed balls myself.
Wonderful idea!

Seed bombs are also good for turning wasteland into something productive.... with the permission of the owner of course! :oops: :roll:
by trekmate
Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:35 am
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Hello from the Fens of Lincolnshire, UK
Replies: 14
Views: 606

Re: Hello from the Fens of Lincolnshire, UK

First, forgive me if I miss anything - it's an age thing! ;) 38mm was decided by experimentation in top-bar hives. A few dozen of us tried various widths of top-bar from 32mm to 42mm (one size per hive) over a couple of seasons and watched for cross-combing (one comb being attached to more than one ...
by trekmate
Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:13 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: Treatment Free Backlash-What's Driving It?
Replies: 12
Views: 1565

Re: Treatment Free Backlash Whats Driving It

On that topic Adam, what is the status of treatment free beekeeping in the UK? I've heard it is being done, but how genuinely sustainable is it? It's happening, but with varying degrees of success. One hobby beekeeer in NE England has not treated for around 8 years and gives swarms away every year....
by trekmate
Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:13 am
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Hello from the Fens of Lincolnshire, UK
Replies: 14
Views: 606

Re: Hello from the Fens of Lincolnshire, UK

GregV - 32mm is too NARROW. Hence the addition of 6mm shims to make up to 38mm, which is a bit more than in framed hives. It's been found that 38mm is best for the brood nest area as with natural comb (no foundation) you'll frequently see drone brood cells facing each other on adjacent combs, which ...
by trekmate
Sun Mar 12, 2017 7:33 am
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Hello from the Fens of Lincolnshire, UK
Replies: 14
Views: 606

Re: Hello from the Fens of Lincolnshire, UK

HI Ben and welcome from t'other side of the Pennines. I've only ever kept bees in top-bar hives. If you need any advice or tip on those I'll be glad to help. If all goes well you may get a swarm from your other hive. It's stunning how quickly than can build up in the spring in the right conditions. ...
by trekmate
Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:05 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: Early spring
Replies: 11
Views: 1315

Re: Early spring

I should add to that , I also consider the stability in the weather. In my area (NW England) we can get long periods of rain in spring which will prevent virgin queens flying and mating.
by trekmate
Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:01 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: Early spring
Replies: 11
Views: 1315

Re: Early spring

Added: I am thinking if you (and others also) have plenty of capped drone brood, it maybe an OK date to start splitting as well; just a bit risky in that the new queens will be ready to mate in about 3 weeks but the drones are ready in about 4 weeks; if split too soon, the drones may not be ready y...
by trekmate
Fri Dec 09, 2016 8:24 am
Forum: Randoms
Topic: question language about feral bees
Replies: 12
Views: 520

Re: question language about feral bees

Varroa Apiary wrote:... Are Homo sapiens is FERAL? Joking ;)...


Some humans are DEFINITELY feral! :? :lol:
by trekmate
Fri Dec 09, 2016 8:17 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: Entrance location
Replies: 2
Views: 310

Re: Entrance location

I use top-bar hives with fixed (22mm round) entrances towards one end. The brood nest is at the entrance end of the hive in 99% of colonies (there's always one that hasn't read the book!). As the colony expands, combs beyond the brood nest will be for honey storage. I use this to decide where to sta...
by trekmate
Thu Dec 08, 2016 8:01 am
Forum: Randoms
Topic: question language about feral bees
Replies: 12
Views: 520

Re: question language about feral bees

FERAL - has been domesticated, but returned to the wild ie feral dog. WILD - has never been domesticated. While bees are not really domesticated (they just happen to live in homes we provide), most in UK that live in unsupported nests are described as feral to distinguish them from the managed colon...
by trekmate
Tue Nov 29, 2016 8:09 am
Forum: Announcements
Topic: Moderators wanted
Replies: 11
Views: 839

Re: Moderators wanted

I'd like to add my thanks to that. This forum has become pleasurable again. Well done all!
by trekmate
Wed Nov 02, 2016 8:06 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: Fall nectar
Replies: 12
Views: 792

Re: Fall nectar

For the last week, here in the NW UK I've been able to smell the drying ivy nectar near the hives. They're clearly taking a lot!
by trekmate
Tue Sep 20, 2016 7:26 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: Bee's least favorite color
Replies: 5
Views: 587

Re: Bee's least favorite color

Don't forget that bees don't see the red end of the light spectrum. Anything red appears as black to them, so maybe your red T shirt experience supports the black theory?
by trekmate
Mon May 23, 2016 7:20 am
Forum: Topbar
Topic: Moisture issues with TBH
Replies: 23
Views: 1456

Re: Moisture issues with TBH

I live in one of the wetter parts of UK and have never had moisture problems in the roof of my TBHs. My roofs are deeper (minimum of four inch sides) than yours (by the photos on bee-thing) and allow a good airflow over the top-bars. For the roof covering I use aluminium sheet (litho-plates) recycle...
by trekmate
Sun May 08, 2016 6:51 am
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Alan from Sussex, England
Replies: 3
Views: 330

Re: Alan from Sussex, England

Hi Alan. I'm in NW England, but there are others lurking here. You could also check out an embryonic UK forum at http://treatmentfreebeekeepers.co.uk/ for local advice.
by trekmate
Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:16 am
Forum: Topbar
Topic: Top Bar support
Replies: 4
Views: 597

Re: Top Bar support

Most of my TBH are 48 inches long internally. I use seasoned wood of all sorts (cheap pine, red cedar, used scaffold planks, pallets) and have had no problem with warping (the oldest is eight years old). The sides are protected from the extremes of wet and sun by the roof which may help. I only prot...
by trekmate
Thu Mar 10, 2016 7:53 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: Oscar Perone hive doesn't control varroa
Replies: 7
Views: 1236

Re: Oscar Perone hive doesn't control varroa

I guess you can add this to the Warre and the topbar and all the whatever elses. There is no magical hive that makes everything better. We can certainly make things worse, but there are a whole lot of people using Langs successfully. I encourage people to try other hive styles, but let's not preten...
by trekmate
Mon Mar 07, 2016 7:45 am
Forum: Basic Beekeeping
Topic: What is the funktion of afterswarms?
Replies: 7
Views: 744

Re: What is the funktion of afterswarms?

The evolutionary benefit of a big strong hive is the ability to increase reproductive success by throwing out swarm after swarm and to swarm as early as possible to take advantage of winter die outs. Hopefully not to the point of emptying the home nest altogether. Who knows there may be some hidden...
by trekmate
Wed Jan 06, 2016 9:13 am
Forum: First Year
Topic: Finding Feral Bees
Replies: 5
Views: 834

Re: Finding Feral Bees

If you are seeing honeybees in your garden I'd try swarm traps/bait hives. To try and locate where those bees are coming from, have a go at beelining. Have a look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJ7eqau_q5E for a description and method. The triangulation method (two bait stations a few hundred ya...
by trekmate
Tue Jan 05, 2016 8:12 am
Forum: Topbar
Topic: Observation Windows
Replies: 6
Views: 544

Re: Observation Windows

I have TBH with windows and without. Those with, I keep in places where land owners are keen to see what's happening and are happy for me to show others the hives. Those without (simpler to build) go to other places. In my early years the windows were (as you say) very helpful, but in time I've gain...
by trekmate
Tue Oct 06, 2015 7:11 am
Forum: Advanced Beekeeping
Topic: The importance of Space Management
Replies: 6
Views: 809

Re: The importance of Space Management

That has very clearly explained the "keep strong colonies" conundrum for me! Thank you!
by trekmate
Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:06 am
Forum: First Year
Topic: Haven't been around... because my hive died.
Replies: 10
Views: 966

Re: Haven't been around... because my hive died.

In UK we usually find earwigs (don;t know if you have them is US but there's sure to be something similar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earwig) in bee hives. They eat much of the detritus on a hive floor or drop board including, I believe, Varroa. Hence the disappearing mite corpses.
by trekmate
Mon Aug 24, 2015 7:35 am
Forum: Advanced Beekeeping
Topic: Bottom Boards - Screened or Solid
Replies: 51
Views: 5050

Re: Bottom Boards - Screened or Solid

Condensation is caused by humid air hitting a cooler surface. Speculation: Thinking back to bees in a tree, there is no additional ventilation in the summer, but they have at least 6 inches of wood between them and the outside world giving at least six times the insulation of the average hive. Extra...
by trekmate
Sun Aug 09, 2015 8:34 pm
Forum: Outside the US
Topic: UK & Ireland
Replies: 8
Views: 967

Re: UK & Ireland

Hi Moo I'm not quite treatment free yet, but close (one hive out of eight had a sugar dusting to knock back Varroa). I live in the far west of North Yorkshire (close to Lancashire) and the weather is my biggest challenge by far. My bees are dark local mongrels, most of them descendants of a feral co...
by trekmate
Tue Aug 04, 2015 12:56 pm
Forum: Advanced Beekeeping
Topic: Bottom Boards - Screened or Solid
Replies: 51
Views: 5050

Re: Bottom Boards - Screened or Solid

I have both solid & screened bottoms in top-bar hives. The screened bottoms are permanently closed. The reason for the screens was initially monitoring for Varroa, but as I treated less and less there seemed no point in building in an extra complication. In "Natural Beekeeping" I alway...
by trekmate
Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:33 pm
Forum: Topbar
Topic: Topbar Bear Mess - How to Fix
Replies: 14
Views: 1587

Re: Topbar Bear Mess - How to Fix

You could also try the method shown half-way down this page http://www.thegardenacademy.com/BK_-_Rescue_Frames.html

Once the bars are made they are easy to add combs to and I've found them very reliable.
by trekmate
Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:31 pm
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Hi from NW England
Replies: 0
Views: 266

Hi from NW England

Hi I live in the North-West of England on the top of a very exposed hill! Been keeping bees in top-bar hives for 6 years with varying degrees of success. The only treatment I've used in that time is sugar-dusting for Varroa. I've found I've had to do that less as time goes on and aim to be treatment...

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