Optimum Entrance(s) Configuration (Langstroth)

Treatment-free bees for sale. Must be treatment free according to the forum definition for the protection of our users. Equipment as described, buyer beware.
Herndon
Freshman Beekeeper
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:38 pm
Location: Virginia

Optimum Entrance(s) Configuration (Langstroth)

Postby Herndon » Wed Apr 04, 2018 4:56 pm

Solomon had a great interview with Jason Bruns about trapping swarms. I saw on Jason’s website that he uses an upper entrance, lower entrance and 1” holes in the hive bodies and supers in Indiana. He runs his hives 3 deep.

What is the optimum arrangement for entrances (no bearding/great honey/overwintering)?

The beeks I know here (and me) do best running 2 deeps with a medium. I currently run a screened bottom board with a open entrance and Brushy Mountain inner cover with a small top opening. My survival rates are above average, but my bees will beard 5 months of the year when they should be inside dancing. I am in Hardiness Zone 7a on the East Coast where it almost never gets below 0 Fahrenheit.


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Michael Bush
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Location: Nehawka, Nebraska
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Re: Optimum Entrance(s) Configuration (Langstroth)

Postby Michael Bush » Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:44 pm

The problem with measuring what is better with bees is that bees are so adaptable and are so good and adjusting the management of ventilation to match what is available. Bees are opportunistic nesters. They can't make the shelter they live in, they can only arrange what is in that cavity. My take is this: Bees have one issue to deal with as far as ventilation all year around (besides breathing) and that is getting rid of moist air. In the summer they are cooling the hive, which requires evaporation and then disposal of the moisture. In a flow they are drying nectar, which requires getting rid of moist air. In the winter they are metabolizing sugar and producing CO2 and H2O. So again, they need to get rid of moist air to prevent condensation dripping on them. Moist air rises. The easiest thing is to let it rise and leave. So an upper entrance meets that requirement. Both a top and bottom creates a chimney effect, which at times may save the bees work and at times may create more work.
"Everything works if you let it"--James "Big Boy" Medlin
http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm

Herndon
Freshman Beekeeper
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 6:38 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Optimum Entrance(s) Configuration (Langstroth)

Postby Herndon » Sat Apr 14, 2018 12:58 am

@Michael Bush. Thank you. I have been using the standard kits and have grown less convinced that is the best single year round configuration. Time to build a top entrance.


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