Most liked method...

How to make queens for yourself, don't be held back by the availability from somebody who is not local to you.
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TFNZ
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Most liked method...

Postby TFNZ » Wed May 20, 2015 8:40 pm

First off hi ya from New Zealand, I am just wondering on others fav type of queen rearing. I have been doing a little bit of the Hopkins method and also just some walk away splits...
Last edited by TFNZ on Wed May 20, 2015 9:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Solomon
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Solomon » Wed May 20, 2015 8:56 pm

My preferred method is to use the Ben Harden method, queenright cell building. I take the resulting queen cells and place them with one frame of brood and one frame of stores in a queen castle. Since they're three frame nucs, I put in another frame of either honey, brood, or foundation. After the queens are hatched and laying, I sell them or combine the good ones with the poor ones to make 5-frame nucs, then sell those, or the queens. If I sell a queen out of a five frame nuc, I combine the leftover nuc with another five frame nuc to make a new hive.
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WestyMcFinn
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby WestyMcFinn » Wed May 20, 2015 9:25 pm

Did my first grafting today. Placed them in a queen right starter as in Ben Harden method. No idea what to expect first time, but happy to get started.

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Solomon
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Solomon » Wed May 20, 2015 9:30 pm

Keep us updated.
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Michael Bush
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Michael Bush » Thu May 21, 2015 11:32 am

What I would do if I had the time and what I actually do are different. Typically I take a moderately strong hive, make it queenless and compress it until it's overflowing with bees (remove boxes and reduce the size). The next day I graft and put the cells in the queenless starter/finisher. 10 days later I break up the whole hive for mating nucs and give the cells to them (and other hives for mating nucs if I run out of mating nucs). The next batch will probably be the same. The next batch I have mating nucs, so I don't need to break it up for mating nucs, so I probably leave that hive a queen cell and let her emerge and get them queenright again.

When I have the time to spend, I would do a swarm box for a starter and set up a queenright finisher with the queen in the bottom box, an excluder, a box in between (probably emerging brood) and a box with pollen, nectar and open brood on the top with the cells in it. Excess boxes of honey would be on the bottom and any other boxes of brood can be between the excluder and the top box if I have them.
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TFNZ
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby TFNZ » Fri May 22, 2015 9:16 pm

Thanks guys very helpful...

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Re: Most liked method...

Postby lharder » Sat May 23, 2015 12:57 pm

Have been farting around with a bit of queen rearing this spring and am gravitating to a system. Tried a 10 frame cell starter at first but with only a few hives, getting enough bees in it was a problem. My cloake board was too much for my scale of beekeeping. So I've gone to a 5 frame starter/finisher. I have one hive that uses its top entrance quite a bit. I start by putting some brood open and capped over an excluder about 5 days before I start. When I start I take a 5 frame nuc box, put in a frame of capped brood with bees, some honey and pollen, an empty frame (they make lots of wax) and shake nurse bees off the remaining frames I had above an excluder. I put it on top of the hive that has its top entrance reversed, and bottom entrance blocked. The foragers will start populating the nuc, I mean really fill it up. 24 hours later I find a partially built comb with eggs from the hive I want to make queens from. Last time they made 7 queen cells, about the right amount for me to deal with.

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Allen Newberry
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Allen Newberry » Wed May 27, 2015 10:57 pm

I have been finding the queen putting her in a box with a some bees/supplies. Then I cut out the lower part of a few cells with eggs/larvae for good measure with my hive tool in the original hive. Let them make some cells then break the hive up into however many boxes I feel comfortable with in regards to bee population and supplies. I did this earlier this year and ended up with four boxes with cells, of which two ended up with mated queens. So, one hive became three. I am happy with the results for backyard expansion. If I was selling queens I could do queen castles and stretch out the resources some more.

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Solomon
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Solomon » Thu May 28, 2015 2:16 pm

Welcome Allen!
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Harley
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Harley » Thu Jun 04, 2015 2:18 am

Ben Hardin method? I looked it up and the gist I got was you basically put pollen brood and graft bar over an excluder and they bees do the rest and this can be done on a production colony? Is there more to it than that?
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Solomon
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Solomon » Thu Jun 04, 2015 2:31 am

A little bit. Finesse is important. Make sure you follow the instructions you found closely. It's usually good for about 12-20 queens at a go in my experience. Not a super high production method, but reliable and can be run continuously without compromising the hive.
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby ChrisM » Sat Jun 20, 2015 4:35 am

Hi (also from NZ), this is much more a request for advice than it is my most liked method since I am too new to have liked anything yet. I listened to the podcast on expansionist model discussed by Solomon; that was awesome. I want to make a series of Nuc's not specifically queen rearing. We got our first colony late last spring as a swarm via a local family who posted on fb they were surrounded... We put them in a top bar hive I had already built, timing was very good for us as newbees. Anyway that is history and we are now in southern hemisphere winter and have 20x 19" top bars of foundationless comb in a big top bar hive. There are about 8 frames of brood, 12 frames honey stores for winter (never fed sugar, haven't yet needed any treatments) bees are carni. Our plan in spring is to go for some expansion, we only have one colony so we need to. I have built more big top bar hives. They are roughly 4 deeps in volume 36x 19" bars. So, the plan is to wait for drones in the air and then to put 5 frames including queen into one of the spare hives with a couple empty bars and a follower board. The spare hives will be set up with end and middle holes so each one can house 3x 12 frame nuc's. Having removed existing queen and created our first nuc, we'll wait for queen cells to appear in main colony. Eventually splitting up those queen cells to create more nuc's just prior to hatching. I will make some rescue bars with bent "L" of wire mesh if we need to split the comb and put each on a rescue bar. (no foundation, no frame on my bars). Thus we get several queenless nuc's with queen cells about ready to hatch. Depending on how they go, we might get some queens operating some weeks later and then we look to create further nuc's if conditions would really support it. I'm not optimistic we can steal a bar from each nuc each week as discussed in the podcast, but very conservatively we'll see. I can imagine even with a few failures from our own ineptitude that we might have essentially split our hive into 5 nuc's prior to summer. This is a long way short of queen rearing but for junior beekeepers like us it is a step up. Last year it was pretty dry and we had a long dearth. We are aiming at what I would try to call 'natural expansion'. Interested if anyone in our position would do the same or if you think I'm nuts. We also want to see if we can rent out some hives using the money to help fund more hives and purchasing some extra nuc's to go from one hive up to about 10 hives for two of us to look after in local neighbourhood. Any criticism or advice most welcome....

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Solomon
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby Solomon » Mon Jun 22, 2015 12:57 pm

I say go for it, tell us how it works out.
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SiWolKe
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby SiWolKe » Thu Apr 13, 2017 4:20 pm

I plan my first multiplying this year the moment the weather stabilizes and hopefully, before the bees swarm. First in one bee yard where the development is two weeks earlier and main flow now will start.

My two survivors are strong and I see not much difference in health so I want to use both to make 3 nucs out of one hive ( if possible), queen split included.
I put a shallow under to make them build more drone brood which they did already under the standard frames.

I plan to take out the queen and put her into a box with three frames of brood ( mixed, but one capped and hatching) and much food, some empty comb and foundation or empty frames.

The cell builders ( maybe I reduce the space) have the foragers, if possible I will find a light comb with eggs and young larvae to cut similar to the miller method. If not I will let them do it like they want, I´m not in need of many queens and if they have built cells on different combs these I can use for the nucs. So far they used two or three combs in the past.

Maybe I will decide otherwise the moment I check and put in a new drawn comb into the broodnest area to wait for the queens to lay eggs into, then take her out. Depends on how the situation is.

The moment these cells or the first cells are capped I want to use them for the nucs and split the colony ( colonies). I have 4 six frame boxes for that.
I will install robber sceens, I will put in honey frames.

How do I place these? I would like to have some foragers in every nuc and I would like to keep them in the same apiary.
Is this possible?
If I place them together, two under, two on top, at the original place will the new queens find back? Or must I place them with distance?
Shall i leave the original place empty?

Or shall I leave the smallest at the original place and wait for the others to change house bees to foragers?
Civility is strength. http://www.VivaBiene.de

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SiWolKe
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Re: Most liked method...

Postby SiWolKe » Fri Apr 14, 2017 11:41 am

Had a chat with my new mentor and he said to break up the cell builder and scatter the nucs in my bee yard after the cells are capped and distributed.

Leave the old place empty where the cell builder was placed.

Well, I know this was a dumb question maybe but I´m new to this.
Civility is strength. http://www.VivaBiene.de


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