From Central Massachusetts

Please post a new topic introducing yourself, where you are, what you do, your beekeeping experience and what you plan to do in the future.
csharpdev
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Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:49 pm
Location: Central Massachusetts

From Central Massachusetts

Postby csharpdev » Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:05 pm

Hello, I'm Dan. I'm a software engineer and wanna be homesteader. So far I've got a couple garden beds, a few fruit trees (not yet fruiting/flowering) and a bunch of chickens. Next year I hope to add bees if funds and time allow. My adventures on You Tube the last week or so have led me to decide on treatment free beekeeping and right now I'm leaning towards medium 10 frame hives with foundationless frames and I'd like to try and catch some wild swarm(s)... beyond that I still have a lot to figure out.

moebees
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Location: Illinois

Re: From Central Massachusetts

Postby moebees » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:44 pm

Welcome to the forum Dan. Some of the people you see on youtube are contributors here and will be happy to answer questions.
Sam Droege, a biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey—“bees are not optional."

lharder
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Re: From Central Massachusetts

Postby lharder » Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:07 pm

Welcome.

Investment in a table saw would allow you to make much of your own equipment reducing costs and would be handy for other projects. I use lots of scrap wood.

I use all mediums and allows maximum flexibility. Really useful with only a few hives.

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GregV
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Re: From Central Massachusetts

Postby GregV » Thu Sep 14, 2017 10:47 pm

csharpdev wrote:Hello, I'm Dan. I'm a software engineer and wanna be homesteader. So far I've got a couple garden beds, a few fruit trees (not yet fruiting/flowering) and a bunch of chickens. Next year I hope to add bees if funds and time allow. My adventures on You Tube the last week or so have led me to decide on treatment free beekeeping and right now I'm leaning towards medium 10 frame hives with foundationless frames and I'd like to try and catch some wild swarm(s)... beyond that I still have a lot to figure out.


+1 to a table saw investment.
Bee jacket/smoker/hive tool (optional) - all you need.
I would not buy anything else.
Start scanning the craigslist and local dumpsters for free lumber/plywood/sheet metal (unless have already).
Free materials are a plenty.
This is how I got back into this thing again, after many years - was thinking how to re-use the pile of lumber in the garage.
Build bee hives. Bingo!

csharpdev
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Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:49 pm
Location: Central Massachusetts

Re: From Central Massachusetts

Postby csharpdev » Fri Sep 15, 2017 12:22 am

I already have access to a table saw.
My chicken coop has a dirt floor, block foundation and walls framed with pallets...all free. Sadly time constraints forced me to buy roof/siding materials from Lowe's. I prefer free/cheap materials.

Today I started looking at top bar hives online because they seem easier to make.

I picked up Michael Bush's book from the library so I'll be doing some book learnin too.

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GregV
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Re: From Central Massachusetts

Postby GregV » Fri Sep 15, 2017 4:36 pm

C# Dev:

There are many discussions on this forum under the "hives".
One thing to consider if you are being a "freelancer" and have freedom that way - do consider being at least partially compatible to the "standard Lang equipment". I am being a "freelancer" myself and build whatever the heck I want. One decision I made up front - I am compatible to Lang frames and that makes the live so much easier now and going forward too (and yet I don't have a single Lang hive and have no plans for any).

So, you want to consider some sort of data compatibility with the other systems, so to speak (you being a C# Dev should understand).
You don't want to paint yourself into a corner for the sake of short-term quick results (many, if not most, TB hive developers do not understand this issue up front and then run into system interchange difficulties).

T-SQL/C# Dev too. :)

csharpdev
Freshman Beekeeper
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:49 pm
Location: Central Massachusetts

Re: From Central Massachusetts

Postby csharpdev » Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:17 pm

I'm glad I've got time to figure all this out. It's starting to become like when I cook something new; I look at half a dozen (or more) recipes and follow none of them.

I've got visions in my head of using a long top bar hive and doing splits using dividers and then stacking lang boxes on top for supers. But TBH tend to be deeper and how would I bait them up into a medium super with a brood from below...or move a medium frame down if the queen laid in it.

Then I started thinking what if I made a long horizontal lang hive instead. Make square boxes and have holes between them so the bees can go between boxes like one hive and then rotate box(es) 90 degrees to make a separate hive with it's own entrance. But the idea of using mediums to save weight would be negated by making them 19 7/8 x 19 7/8. Basic idea being like a townhouse for bees with the hopes that shared walls will cut down on energy required to heat in winter.

Or maybe I'll just build medium 8 or 10 frame lang boxes out of butt jointed plywood.

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GregV
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Re: From Central Massachusetts

Postby GregV » Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:55 pm

Before you get too deep into this, be aware of the energy profiles of different structures (homes or hives, all the same).
https://sites.google.com/site/lowenergyhome/architectur
Then see what fits your local climate profile better.
As as homesteader, you'd be interested in energy efficiency of your bees, I imagine (which is directly proportional to honey consumption and successful wintering, ultimately).


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