Mite Biting (video)

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GregV
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Mite Biting (video)

Postby GregV » Sat Jun 10, 2017 2:23 pm

Let me plug a link here next to Jeff's.

We were talking here recently - the bees should really be like your average cats and dogs that take care of their own ticks and flees.
They should be biting and scratching those mites.
Totally normal behavior as for me, that should just be unleashed and allowed to take its course.

This video shows just that - bees scratching and biting (I would turn the music down, however):
http://cba.stonehavenlife.com/2009/04/v ... bee-louse/

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SiWolKe
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby SiWolKe » Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:12 am

There is a big difference between the bee louse and the mite.

The bee louse is a kind of wingless fly which is not attached to the bee like the mite.
It is harmless to the bee, only the queen can be hindered in laying when she is covered with lice but I have never seen lice on the queen.
I have many lice in my colonies because they area sign of the lack of chemicals.

The mite when it is drawing blood is attached and I believe it gives a kind of narcoticum like a tick.
After some time the bee struggles no more.

Even so the grooming bees seem to smell them or the bees with mites attached show some stress because of the blood sucking.
This seem to trigger grooming.
But the bees are not able themselves to throw off blood sucking mites like the lice. Other bees must do this.

Nice video but it gives evidence only of the bees getting rid of the lice. The mites stay on and the other bees are not grooming the infested bees.
This shows not the grooming trait but normal behavior of the average bee.
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GregV
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby GregV » Mon Jun 12, 2017 2:49 pm

SiWolKe wrote:There is a big difference between the bee louse and the mite..


Well, don't we see at least some mites in the video?

It is clearly titled:
Video: Honey Bees Fighting Varroa Mites and Bee Louse


I am pretty sure I saw classic Varroa mites in the video and the bees were scratching them off very vigorously.
I did not even see a bee louse which is like a "wingless fly".

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SiWolKe
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby SiWolKe » Mon Jun 12, 2017 2:58 pm

Sorry Greg, the bees in the video scratch off lice, not mites even if there are mites being seen.
IMHO
Here my pict taken of a "louse"

Bienenlaus.jpg
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby GregV » Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:42 pm

SiWolKe wrote:Sorry Greg, the bees in the video scratch off lice, not mites even if there are mites being seen.
IMHO
Here my pict taken of a "louse"

Bienenlaus.jpg


OK; thanks. I need to google on the "bee lice" more. Just now I am looking at the lice images (never bothered before).

PS: so I read that the bee lice quite "nimble" bugs; if bees are being able to chase and chew the rather quick lice off, chasing off a mite should be possible if not easier. It is, probably, more of an issue of recognizing the mites as nuisance initially.

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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby SiWolKe » Mon Jun 12, 2017 6:28 pm

Watching the lice one sees that they shun the light, they go off the bees if you look at them in daylight and hide in the combs and they are not attached like the mites.
I don´t know exactly how they nourish but they seem not to bring virus disease.

I believe once the mites suck bee blood they are like ticks.
Other bees, like Jeffs mite biters could groom them off but not the bee itself if the mite is not being reached by the mandibles.

The mites prefer places where the bees scratching does not reach them. The body positions and behaviors of infested bees could trigger grooming if not the stress pheromones.
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby GregV » Mon Jun 12, 2017 7:09 pm

Maybe these bee lice are of some interest.
The hive with a lot of lice have NO varroa.


Read more here:
https://honeybeesuite.com/lousy-companions/

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SiWolKe
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby SiWolKe » Mon Jun 12, 2017 7:59 pm

No varroa..hehe..nice dream!

I´ve never seen a louse on a queen, must be another race of lice.
And I have never seen a trail like from wax moths.

Thanks for the link, now I know what they eat.
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby GregV » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:28 pm

I looked again.
I am pretty sure you can distinguish Varroa from Braula by their outlines and behavior.
Braula runs around; Varroa sits tight.
On the third picture down you can see how a bee is trying to scratch Varroa away (pretty sure that is Varroa).
BraulaAndVarrowOnTheSameBee.jpg
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby SiWolKe » Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:02 am

Jeff this is a question directed at you:

is the grooming trait a behavior between bees, one ( or more) bee (s) grooming the other or
the bees grooming themselves?
I believe every bee grooms itself, no special behavior.
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Michael Bush
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby Michael Bush » Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:18 am

>Braula runs around; Varroa sits tight.

Varroa can run VERY fast and while they do the "squirrel thing" (run or stand still) they really go fast when they want to move. You seldom see them run on comb, but I've seen it and they are also fast there.
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby SiWolKe » Tue Jun 13, 2017 2:44 pm

Michael Bush wrote:>Braula runs around; Varroa sits tight.

Varroa can run VERY fast and while they do the "squirrel thing" (run or stand still) they really go fast when they want to move. You seldom see them run on comb, but I've seen it and they are also fast there.


I believe that´s right. When they smell the open brood they race in. When I opened the cell samples and they came out with the pupa, they rushed back in.
Could be they are only static sucking bee blood on the bee ( in the phoretic state). When I saw a mite on the bee it never moved.
Some claim they jump on other bees while those forage on the flowers.
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Michael Bush
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby Michael Bush » Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:37 pm

The ones riding around on their backs can leave very quickly. I've watched a bee with one on its back do the "get it off me" dance and finally recruit a bee to help. The helper tried to groom the Varroa off but it jumped onto the helper and the original bee acted relieved and wandered off while the helper started doing the "get it off me" dance. The ones on their abdomens are attached and cannot quickly let go.
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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby Nordak » Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:32 pm

Hey Sibylle, yes, all bees self-groom. You are correct. From my observations, bees often groom other bees as well. I don't think this is particularly a special trait. Without the biting trait, I'm not so certain grooming alone would help tremendously with varroa. As Michael pointed out, mites easily latch onto another host.

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Re: Mite Biting (video)

Postby SiWolKe » Wed Jun 14, 2017 4:17 am

Yes, my thoughts.
Sometimes I see bees desperately trying to get rid of mites? which must be on the underside. This movements trigger the grooming which perhaps changes to mite biting.
I filmed this once, several bees grooming one, but I did not see if they are successful.
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