Superinfection exclusion and the long-term survival of honey bees in Varroa-infested colonies

Please place treatment free research here. There's a lot of research spread around the Internet that is related to treatment free beekeeping. This forum is an effort to try and consolidate some of this, especially new research as it becomes available.
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ExpatBeekeeper
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Superinfection exclusion and the long-term survival of honey bees in Varroa-infested colonies

Postby ExpatBeekeeper » Tue Feb 16, 2016 12:06 am

NB: I tried to post this paper when it was published, but at the time it wasn't an open paper, now it is... enjoy..

Abstract
Over the past 50 years, many millions of European honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies have died as the ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has spread around the world. Subsequent studies have indicated that the mite’s association with a group of RNA viral pathogens (Deformed Wing Virus, DWV) correlates with colony death. Here, we propose a phenomenon known as superinfection exclusion that provides an explanation of how certain A. mellifera populations have survived, despite Varroa infestation and high DWV loads. Next-generation sequencing has shown that a non-lethal DWV variant ‘type B’ has become established in these colonies and that the lethal ‘type A’ DWV variant fails to persist in the bee population. We propose that this novel stable host-pathogen relationship prevents the accumulation of lethal variants, suggesting that this interaction could be exploited for the development of an effective treatment that minimises colony losses in the future.

ismej2015186a.pdf
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Beekeeper, Meadmaker, Teaboy, and Gopher. Richmond, VA

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Michael Bush
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Re: Superinfection exclusion and the long-term survival of honey bees in Varroa-infested colonies

Postby Michael Bush » Tue Feb 16, 2016 2:32 am

In other words, if no one ever treated the type "B" would take over and the problem would be solved...
"Everything works if you let it"--James "Big Boy" Medlin
http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm

lharder
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Re: Superinfection exclusion and the long-term survival of honey bees in Varroa-infested colonies

Postby lharder » Tue Feb 16, 2016 1:28 pm

And if we stopped moving bees everywhere, we could reduce the numbers of new challenges we keep introducing to bees.


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