Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Please place treatment free research here. There's a lot of research spread around the Internet that is related to treatment free beekeeping. This forum is an effort to try and consolidate some of this, especially new research as it becomes available.
User avatar
Nordak
Backyard Beekeeper
Posts: 438
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2016 6:24 am
Location: Arkansas

Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby Nordak » Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:39 am


User avatar
Michael Bush
Backyard Beekeeper
Posts: 351
Joined: Wed May 20, 2015 11:34 am
Location: Nehawka, Nebraska
Contact:

Re: Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby Michael Bush » Wed Sep 21, 2016 10:38 am

There are survivors all over, but it is nice to see the scientists acknowledge it at some level
"Everything works if you let it"--James "Big Boy" Medlin
http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm

moebees
Backyard Beekeeper
Posts: 378
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:57 pm
Location: Illinois

Re: Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby moebees » Wed Sep 21, 2016 8:03 pm

There are survivors all over, but it is nice to see the scientists acknowledge it at some level


But can you find a treatment Beek that will acknowledge it?
Sam Droege, a biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey—“bees are not optional."

User avatar
Nordak
Backyard Beekeeper
Posts: 438
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2016 6:24 am
Location: Arkansas

Re: Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby Nordak » Thu Sep 22, 2016 1:14 am

I agree Michael. I'm sure there are thousands of examples here in the U.S. alone.

Moe, I haven't found one yet...

User avatar
Michael Bush
Backyard Beekeeper
Posts: 351
Joined: Wed May 20, 2015 11:34 am
Location: Nehawka, Nebraska
Contact:

Re: Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby Michael Bush » Thu Sep 22, 2016 12:46 pm

>But can you find a treatment Beek that will acknowledge it?

No. They insist that any bees not treated in three years are dead. They insist any colony that you claim survived more than three years, died out and was repopulated with a swarm. And that swarm came from someones treated bees... That is their model of the world.
"Everything works if you let it"--James "Big Boy" Medlin
http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm

lharder
Hobbyist
Posts: 503
Joined: Wed May 20, 2015 6:36 pm
Location: Kamloops, BC

Re: Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby lharder » Thu Sep 22, 2016 4:55 pm

First they say that bees will die after one year, then 2 years, then 3 years. How many queens make it past 2 years anyway?

Even if they did die after 2 years, wouldn't that be a huge improvement compared to how things were when varroa first moved in?

Ignoring survival is not science, its blinders. People get mad when I say stuff like that.

User avatar
Nordak
Backyard Beekeeper
Posts: 438
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2016 6:24 am
Location: Arkansas

Re: Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby Nordak » Thu Sep 22, 2016 5:17 pm

The other forum is a minefield right now. Pretty ridiculous.

Leroy-
Regarding the survival time frame and it's worth. Every time it's brought up, the years required to be considered successfully TF magically go up. Maybe in 20 years we'll have something.

Thanks for updating your scientific research section. I'm trying to wrap my head around the implications of what you posted, but it sounds pretty fascinating. It's good the researchers in your region are taking this stuff seriously.

moebees
Backyard Beekeeper
Posts: 378
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2016 7:57 pm
Location: Illinois

Re: Natural Varroa mite-surviving Apis mellifera honeybee populations

Postby moebees » Thu Sep 22, 2016 5:24 pm

No. They insist that any bees not treated in three years are dead. They insist any colony that you claim survived more than three years, died out and was repopulated with a swarm. And that swarm came from someones treated bees... That is their model of the world.


Exactly. I hear many of them claim wild colonies are replaced every year by swarms from their wonderful treated hives.

The treat first and ask questions later view of the world is so limiting and self destructive. One of my favorite stories is the one Maryann Frazier told about her trip to East Africa and the beeks there said they didn't have any Varroa. She said they found Varroa in the first hive they opened and every one after. But the bees were doing fine. I guess sometimes what you don't know doesn't hurt you. They didn't know that should have been treating for Varroa!
Sam Droege, a biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey—“bees are not optional."


Return to “Scientific Research”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest